ISGlobal | Barcelona Institute for GlobalHealth

The 7th Edition of the Master of Global Health Kicks Off with a Record Number of Students

The 7th Edition of the Master of Global Health Kicks Off with a Record Number of Students

This year, the Master has 32 trainees from over 20 countries

G. Solsona

The courses for the 2018-2019 Master of Global Health and the Master of Clinical Research –International Health, organised by ISGlobal and the University of Barcelona, have started today. To date, this has been the edition with the largest number of enrolled students: over 40 for both masters, from 24 countries and five continents.  

“This great diversity in the origin and background of our students underlines the international character of the cursus and greatly enriches it,” explains Joan Tallada, academic coordinator of the Training Department at ISGlobal.  

The goal of the Master is that the students "not only acquire knowledge, but also analytical and critical thinking capacities to identify the complexity related to the current challenges in global health and to propose sensible solutions,” adds Tallada.

For Nuria Casamitjana, Training director at ISGlobal, the master also offers trainees a unique opportunity to develop a solid network of contacts that will be useful for their professional life.

The Master of Global Health programme consists of 60 ECTS (European credits) and lasts 10 months. It is given in English and is offered in two different tracks: Transdisciplinary Studies in Global Health and tropEd Master of International Health. The International Health Track of the Master in Clinical Research is also coordinated by ISGlobal and focuses on the main health challenges worldwide among the most vulnerable populations. 

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B·Debate 'Open Science: from Values to Practice'

Building a roadmap for transformative change

B·Debate 'Open Science: from Values to Practice'

Image: Biocat

Date:

Venue: Barcelona (venue to be determined in the following days)

The conference 'Open science: from values to practice. Building a roadmap for transformative change' aims to start building a roadmap for practicing Open Science by bringing together national and international experts from different disciplines and exchanging knowledge and good practices. The event itself will be a co-creation experience in dedicated work sessions, joining together to come up with specific recommendations with input from all relevant stakeholders.

The B·Debate session will focus on four main streams of Open Science, that are Open Access, Research integrity and reproducibility, Research evaluation, and Stakeholder engagement.

This session of B·Debate, a joint initiative of Biocat and the “la Caixa” Foundation, is co-organized with the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG), University of Barcelona (UB), Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute and the Open University of Catalonia (UOC).

Registration is open until 2 October. Deadline to submit an abstract to be selected for a poster presentation is 9 July.

Register Now

More Information

B·Debate website


Noche de la Investigación en Cataluña

Noche de la Investigación en Cataluña

 

Date:

Venue: (Diverses localitats) Catalunya

El último viernes del mes de septiembre se celebra en toda Europa la Noche Europea de la Investigación (Researchers 'Night), con el objetivo de acercar la ciencia, la investigación y la tecnología a la ciudadanía.

En Cataluña, bajo el lema "La investigación, patrimonio de todos y todas", tendrán lugar actividades divulgativas el viernes 28 y el sábado 29 de septiembre en Barcelona, ​​Tarragona, Lleida, Girona, Blanes y Vic, entre otras localidades.

Si eres investigador/a, puedes participar de diferentes maneras:

La Noche de la Investigación en Cataluña está organizada por la Universidad de Barcelona (UB), la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB), la Universidad de Girona (UdG), la Universidad Rovira i Virgili (URV), la Universidad de Lleida (UdL) y el Instituto de Salud Global de Barcelona (ISGlobal). Los actos están apoyados por la Comisión Europea como parte de las Acciones Marie Curie, un programa para potenciar carreras del personal investigador europeo.

 


Healthy Liveable Cities: Are We There Yet?

Healthy Liveable Cities: Are We There Yet?

 

Date:

Time: 9.30 h.

Venue: Xipre Room (Doctor Aiguader, 88. Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, PRBB) Barcelona

Speaker: Billie Giles-Corti (RMIT University)

Billie Giles-Corti, a Distinguished Professor at RMIT University and Director of its Urban Futures Enabling Capability Platform, will give a talk entitled "Healthy Liveable Cities: Are We There Yet". Free entrance.


International Making Cities Livable Conference: Putting Research into Practice

International Making Cities Livable Conference: Putting Research into Practice

 

Date:

Time: 9.30 h.

Venue: Xipre Room (Doctor Aiguader, 88. Barcelona Biomedical Research Park, PRBB) Barcelona

Speaker: Suzanne Crowhurst Lennard (Int. Making Cities Livable Conferences)

Next Friday 21st of September, Suzanne Crowhurst Lennard of International Making Cities Livable Conferences will give a talk entitled: "International Making Cities Livable Conference: Putting Research into Practice". Free entrance.


Park(ing) Day Barcelona 2018

Park(ing) Day Barcelona 2018

 

Date:

Time: 9h a 21h

Venue: (En todos los distritos) Barcelona

El Park(ing) Day es un evento anual que tiene lugar en varias ciudades de todo el mundo. Se trata de una acción de ciudad en la que diversas entidades, colectivos y ciudadanía en general transforman de forma temporal plazas públicas de aparcamiento en parques, jardines y otras formas de espacio público con el objetivo de reivindicar un modelo de ciudad centrado en las personas y en el medio ambiente.

ISGlobal tendrá un stand en el Passeig Marítim de la Barceloneta per medir la contaminación del aire y explicar sus efectos sobre la salud. 

Coorganizan: ISGlobal y Cooperativa Espacio Ambiental

Más información

parkingdaybcn.org

 

 


A Workshop to Strengthen Science Management in the Current Global Health Landscape

A Workshop to Strengthen Science Management in the Current Global Health Landscape

The course, aimed at personnel from African Portuguese-speaking countries, was organized by the Calouste Gulbenkian and “la Caixa” Foundations together with ISGlobal and CISM

The second phase of the “Science Management” course, aimed at researchers and managers from Portuguese-speaking countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and organised by the Calouste Gulbenkian and the “la Caixa”  Foundations in collaboration with ISGlobal and the Manhiça Health Research Center (CISM), took place at the CaixaForum in Barcelona from September 10-14. The first phase of the course took place last February in Lisbon. The overall goal of the course was to strengthen leadership and science management capacities in internationally competitive research centers.   

In their welcoming speeches, representatives of both foundations emphasized the key role of science, education and culture in human development, and the ongoing successful collaborations between both foundations. The inaugural session introduced the current tendencies and realities in global health, and Michael Makanga, executive director at EDCTP, listed the key drivers of success in collaborations between African and European institutions, including a shift from “independence to interdependence”. Antoni Plasència, general director of ISGlobal, explained why a global perspective of health is critical, while Eusebio Macete, director at CISM, underlined the need for equitable partnerships.  

During the five days of the workshop, the trainees – researchers and managers from Mozambique, Cape Verde, Angola and Portugal- listened to and shared experiences in different aspects of science management, from strategic planning in a research centre, to project management, communication, ethics, or team management in complex environments. Furthermore, they were able to discuss governance and leadership in research centres with Àngel Font, corporate director of research and strategy at “la Caixa”, Lluís Rovira, director of  CERCA institutes, and Enric Banda, member of ISGlobal’s Board of Trustees, in a discussion chaired by Antoni Plasència and Francisco Saúte.   

“Training personnel from Sub-Saharan research centres in management skills is key to ensure that these countries will develop their research capacities and contribute in a competitive and equitable manner to the global health field,” explains Nuria Casamitjana, director of the training department at ISGlobal.

“I’m very grateful to have had the opportunity of assisting to a course tailored to our necessities as professionals in a low-middle income country context”, says Francisca Reis, Associate Professor at Angola University, and adds “I hope this initiative continues empowering people who have the dream of developing research of excellence in their countries.”

The course included visits to CosmoCaixa, the Barcelona’s Biomedical Research Park (PRBB) and Barcelona’s Scientific Park (PRB). 

 

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Certain Antibodies Against a Sugar are Associated with Malaria Protection

Certain Antibodies Against a Sugar are Associated with Malaria Protection

A study uses a new technique to analyse levels and type of antibodies to a carbohydrate expressed by most living beings

Adapted from Aguilar R et al.

Certain type of antibodies against alpha-Gal- a carbohydrate expressed by many organisms including the malaria parasite- could protect against malaria, according to a new study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by “la Caixa” Foundation. The results, published in Scientific Reports, indicate that alpha-Gal is an interesting candidate to include in future vaccines against malaria and other infectious diseases. 

The magnitude and type of immune response against the malaria parasite is key in controlling the disease. To date, most studies have focused on the antibody response to parasite proteins. However, sugars (or glycans) expressed on the surface of the parasite could also trigger an immune response.  

Alpha-gal is a particularly interesting glycan: it is expressed by practically all organisms on the evolutionary scale, from bacteria in out gut, to pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, protozoan parasites such as P. falciparum (that causes malaria) or mammals such as cows. Only humans, apes and old-world monkeys lack the enzyme to synthesize it and generate a strong immune response against it. Recent studies suggest that antibodies to alpha-Gal could protect against malaria.

In this study, the teams led by Luis Izquierdo and Carlota Dobaño, ISGlobal researchers, joined forces to assess the magnitude and type of antibody responses against alpha-Gal in infants and children from Mozambique (a low malaria transmission region) and Ghana (a high transmission region). They used a technique recently developed by Dobaño’s group that allowed measuring for the first time different subclasses of antibodies against this and other parasite antigens in a single reaction and from one drop of blood.

“The relevance of this study is that it provides new information on a response (anti alpha-Gal) that plays a potential protective role against a variety of infectious diseases, not only malaria,” explains Dobaño

The results show that the levels of different alpha-Gal antibodies vary according to age and are higher in low malaria transmission zones. A significant increase in IgM a-Gal antibodies was observed in the initial months of life, while IgG antibodies increased later in life.  Importantly, an IgM response was associated with protection against clinical malaria, especially in the first months of life, while total IgG were associated with malaria risk. 

“It would be really interesting to identify the specific alpha-Gal glycan expressed by the malaria parasite, and to confirm the potential association between certain IgG subclasses and protection,” says Izquierdo. “In any case, these results confirm that alpha-Gal could be a promising molecule to include in future malaria vaccines,” he adds.  

Reference

Aguilar R, Ubillos I, Vidal M, et al. Antibody responses to α-Gal in African children vary with age and site and are associated with malaria protection. Scientific Reports, 2018. 8:9999. DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-28325-w
 

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Ozenoxacin is a New and Potent Antimicrobial Agent Against Skin Infections

Ozenoxacin is a New and Potent Antimicrobial Agent Against Skin Infections

ISGlobal collaborates with Ferrer laboratories to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the new drug

Janice Haney Carr

 A new molecule developed by Ferrer laboratories has a potent bactericidal activity against pathogens associated to skin infections, according to a microbiological study performed in collaboration with ISGlobal, an institution supported by “la Caixa” Foundation.   

Ozenoxacin, developed by the Spanish laboratory Ferrer, belongs to the new generation of nonfluorinated quinolones. Its potent bactericidal activity (i.e. it kills bacteria) indicates that it could be used against a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. In fact, a first series of clinical trials has shown that an ozenoxacin-based cream is effective in treating impetigo, a frequent skin infection, particularly in children, caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria.

In this study, ISGlobal researchers collaborated with Ferrer to evaluate in vitro (i.e. in the laboratory) the activity of ozenoxacin against a variety of pathogens associated to skin infections, in parallel with a dozen of other antimicrobial agents. To do so, they used bacterial isolates obtained from skin infections of patients from 49 centres in Spain, The Netherlands, Germany, Romania, South Africa and USA (almost 1,100 isolates). They also measured the activity of the different drugs against more than 1,000 Staphylococcus isolates obtained from the clinics. 

Ozenoxacin proved to be the most potent agent against all staphylococci isolates – including those resistant to methicillin – and was also highly active against streptococci (mainly Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae). “Our study indicates the ozenoxacin is a new and potent antimicrobial agent against the most common pathogens associated with skin infections,” comments Yuly López, postdoc researcher at ISGlobal and study co-author. “The emergence of bacteria resistant to the standard treatments underlines the need to find alternative, safe and effective agents. These results support the use of ozenoxacin in impetigo treatment,” says Jordi Vila, director of the Antimicrobial Resistance Initiative at ISGlobal and coauthor of the study.  

Reference:

Canton R, Morrissey I, Vila J et al. Comparative in vitro antibacterial activity of ozenoxacin against Gram-positive clinical isolates. Future Microbiol. 2018 May 1;13:3-19. doi: 10.2217/fmb-2017-0289.

 

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Air Pollution Induces Subclinical Structural Changes in Children’s Brains

Air Pollution Induces Subclinical Structural Changes in Children’s Brains

Study analyses the relationship between exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, basal ganglia volumes, and symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Chronic exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in preadolescent children is associated with subclinical changes in the caudate nucleus of their brains, even when ambient concentrations of PAHs are below the maximum levels established by the European Union. This was the main conclusion of a study published recently in the journal Environment International, which was led by scientists from ISGlobal, a centre supported by the ”la Caixa” Foundation.

PAHs are a group of air pollutants formed during the incomplete combustion of organic material. They are generated as a result of the combustion of fossil and biomass fuels and also found in other media, including cigarette smoke and charcoal-grilled food. In cities such as Barcelona, where the study was carried out, the predominant source of PAHs is vehicular traffic. Earlier studies had observed an association between PAHs and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) in children exposed during the prenatal period, a finding the authors consider to be “particularly worrying”.

The present study, which formed part of the BREATHE project, measured air pollution levels in 39 schools in Barcelona and acquired cerebral images via magnetic resonance imaging for 242 children (boys and girls) between the ages of 8 and 12 years. The participating children were also assessed for the presence of ADHD symptoms. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of exposure to PAHs at school on the volume of the children´s basal ganglia, a brain structure consistently reported as reduced in ADHD children, and the possible association with symptoms of ADHD.

“Our findings indicate that increased exposure to PAHs—in particular benzo[a]pyrene—is associated with a decrease in the size of the caudate nucleus, one of the components of the basal ganglia”, explains Marion Mortamais, ISGlobal researcher and lead author of the study. An increase of approximately 70 pg/m3 in indoor and outdoor levels of  benzo[a]pyrene was associated with a reduction of almost 2% in caudate nucleus volume.  However, this reduction in the size of the caudate nucleus appears to be subclinical because it was not significantly associated with ADHD symptoms.

Marion Mortamais concludes by saying that “the consequences these changes in brain structure may have on the children’s behaviour were not identified in this study but, given the key role played by the caudate nucleus in many cognitive processes and crucial behaviours, any reduction in the volume of this structure is cause for concern in the context of childhood neurodevelopment”.

In the opinion of Jordi Sunyer, head of ISGlobal’s Child Health programme and professor at the Pompeu Fabra University  (UPF), “the findings of this study add to the already abundant evidence that underscores the urgent need to reduce air pollution, in particular traffic-related contamination, and also indicates a need to reassess the annual maximum levels for PAHs established by European regulations”.

 

Reference

Mortamais M, Pujol J, van Drooge BL, et al. Effect of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on basal ganglia and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in primary school children. Environ Int. 2017 May 5;105:12-19. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2017.04.011.

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Risk Gene for Alzheimer’s Disease May Aggravate the Health Effects of Air Pollution on Neurodevelopment in Children

Risk Gene for Alzheimer’s Disease May Aggravate the Health Effects of Air Pollution on Neurodevelopment in Children

Children carrying the ε4 variant of the APOE gene may be particularly vulnerable to the detrimental effects of air pollutants on the brain

There is growing evidence that exposure to air pollution adversely affects cognitive and behavioural development in children. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are, as yet, unknown. Now, the findings of a new study from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institute supported by the ”la Caixa” Banking Foundation, suggest that the ε4 variant of the APOE gene may play a significant role in this process. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Previous studies carried out within the framework of the BREATHE project have linked childhood exposure to air pollution with diminished cognitive development , increased behavioural problems , and even structural differences in the brain s of the children studied.

In the new study, which analysed data from over 1,600 children attending 39 schools in Barcelona, scientists observed that the association between exposure to traffic-related pollution and adverse effects on neurodevelopment was more marked in the children who carried the ε4 allele of the APOE gene . Carriers of this genetic variant had higher behaviour problem scores and their attention capacity developed more slowly. Moreover, the volume of the caudate nucleus, an anatomical brain structure, tended to be smaller in that population.

“These findings suggest that children who carry this allele could be more vulnerable to the detrimental effects that air pollution has on important aspects of their neurodevelopment,” explained Silvia Alemany, ISGlobal researcher and lead author of the study

Neurodegenerative Diseases

“Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress are two of the most well-established mechanisms underlying the adverse health effects of air pollution. Interestingly, both these mechanisms are also involved in the pathogenesis of dementia. In fact, research has demonstrated an association between exposure to air pollution and cognitive impairment in older people. All these considerations, and the fact that APOE ε 4 is the most important known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease , led us to wonder whether the allele might also have a relationship with the adverse effects air pollution has on brain function in children,” says Silvia Alemany.

Genetic data were available for all of the participants. Tests were carried out to evaluate cognitive functions, behavioural problems and possible symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Traffic-related air pollution levels were calculated on the basis of actual measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging data were available for 163 of the study participants.

“More research will be needed in other populations to replicate these results and we need to establish whether this possible genetic vulnerability also applies to exposure to air pollution during earlier stages of development, for example, in the prenatal period,” warns ISGlobal researcher Jordi Sunyer, director of the BREATHE project. “In any case, once again the findings are clear: it is essential to implement measures to reduce traffic in the urban environment and, particularly, in places where children are present, such as the areas around schools.”.

Reference

Alemany S, Vilor-Tejedor N, García-Esteban R, Bustamante M, Dadvand P, Esnaola M, Mortamais M, Forns J, van Drooge BL, Álvarez-Pedrerol M, Grimalt JO, Rivas I, Querol X, Pujol J, Sunyer J. Traffic-Related Air Pollution, APOE Status, and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes among School Children Enrolled in the BREATHE Project (Catalonia, Spain) .Environ Health Perspect. 2018 Aug 2;126(8):087001. doi: 10.1289/EHP2246. eCollection 2018 Aug.

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Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Noise at School and Behavioral Problems in Schoolchildren

Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Noise at School and Behavioral Problems in Schoolchildren

Study published in Environmental Health Perspectives

After three years of a strategic alliance between ISGlobal and CREAL, both institutions merged on June 30, 2016. This news article was originally written for CREAL's website and has been imported to www.isglobal.org after the merger. For more info on the merger, visit: http://ow.ly/qygl306bDbs

Researchers from the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), an ISGlobal allied center, and the University Pompeu Fabra (UPF) have investigated the associations of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants and noise at school on behavioral development of schoolchildren. In this study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, found that children between 7 and 11 years old living in Barcelona exposed to greater air pollution due to traffic near the school have more problems of behavior. Moreover, noise exposure at school was associated with more specific symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

There is growing body of evidence on associations between pre- and postnatal exposure to traffic-related air pollutants and adverse impacts on neuropsychological development of children. The air pollution is considered possible neurotoxic agent in brain development. In this context, the findings of this study confirm and extend sold prior findings as evidence that an increase in behavioral problems in school of those exposed to greater pollution. Moreover, noise exposure has been linked to a reduced number of studies with higher cognitive and behavioral problems in children. The results of this study are the first reported a clear association between exposure to noise in classrooms and major symptoms of ADHD.

 “We have evaluated children aged 7 to 11 years in Barcelona during 2012-2013 in the framework of the BREATHE project. We measured concentrations both inside and outside the classroom of elemental carbon, black carbon and NO2 in two separate campaigns for a week”, said Joan Forns, CREAL an UPF researcher and first author of this study.

The researchers also measured the noise levels inside the classroom. Parents filled out the strengths and difficulties questionnaire to assess child behavioral development, while teachers/tutors the ADHD tests to assess specific ADHD symptoms. “We have seen that the increases in the concentrations of elemental carbon, black carbon and NO2 inside and outdoors of the school are associated with biggest problems in the strengths and difficulties questionnaire, while increases in exposure to noise was significantly associated with increased symptoms of ADHD”, concluded Forns.

Reference

Forns J. et al. Traffic-Related Air Pollution, Noise at School, and Behavioral Problems in Barcelona Schoolchildren: A Cross-Sectional Study. Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1409449

Picture: Escola del Mar, by Kippleboy CC 3.0

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Children who attend schools nearby traffic show a lower cognitive development

Children who attend schools nearby traffic show a lower cognitive development

Press release

After three years of a strategic alliance between ISGlobal and CREAL, both institutions merged on June 30, 2016. This news article was originally written for CREAL's website and has been imported to www.isglobal.org after the merger. For more info on the merger, visit: http://ow.ly/qygl306bDbs

The cognitive development of children attending schools exposed to air pollution because of its proximity to traffic is slowed, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine led by researchers from CREAL.

Many schools are located in close proximity to the busiest streets, with traffic air pollution peaks when children are at school. The objective of this research, part of the BREATHE project, was to evaluate the relationship between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollutants at school and cognitive development measurements in primary school children.

It is suspected that air pollution is a developmental neurotoxicant. In previous animal studies had shown that inhalation of diesel exhaust and ultrafine particles results in elevated cytokine expression and oxidative stress in the brain and altered animal behavior.

Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants during pregnancy or infancy, when the neocortex of the brain rapidly develops, has been related to cognitive delays in children. The brain regions associated with executive functions such as working memory and attention, largely located in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, have shown inflammatory responses after traffic-related air pollution exposure.

"We have found that children attending highly contaminated schools had lower growth in cognitive development than children in schools less polluted. In this sense, children who attend schools with high levels of pollution, both in the classroom and on the playground experienced less growth of cognitive functions essential for learning, the 7% against 11%. These results were confirmed using direct measurements of traffic related pollutants at schools. This can have consequences on school performance and behavior”, explains Jordi Sunyer, principal investigator of the study.

The researchers from CREAL, an ISGlobal alliance research centre, developed a prospective study, from January 2012 to March 2013, of 2,897 children, aged seven to ten years, from 39 schools in Barcelona and Sant Cugat exposed to high and low traffic-related air pollution. The researchers evaluated, in four repeated visits using computerized tests in series lasting approximately 40 minutes in length, their working memory and attention functions because they grow steadily during preadolescence. The researchers measured also the chronic pollution caused by traffic (elemental carbon, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and the ultrafine particle number), which were measured twice during a week campaigns both in the courtyard and inside the classroom, simultaneously. Researchers found, for example, that particulate pollution for elemental carbon reduced by 13% the growth of the working memory.

"The observed association was consistent across cognitive measurements, but it was more evident for superior working memory, which is a good indicator of learning achievements. The impairment of cognitive functions has severe consequences for school achievement. Therefore, reducing the cognitive development of children attending the most polluted schools could lead to a disadvantage that should be considered in monitoring air quality", concludes Sunyer.


Reference:

Sunyer J, Esnaola M, Alvarez-Pedrerol M, Forns J, Rivas I, López-Vicente M, et al. (2015) Association between Traffic-Related Air Pollution in Schools and Cognitive Development in Primary School Children: A Prospective Cohort Study. PLoS Med 12(2): e1001792. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001792

Image:

Children of the Sant Gregori school at Barcelona, participating in the computerized tests. Source/Author: CREAL

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II Jornada “Entorno Urbano y Salud”: El modelo de ciudad como herramienta de salud

II Jornada “Entorno Urbano y Salud”: El modelo de ciudad como herramienta de salud

Enes / Unsplash

Date:

Time: 08.30 h

Venue: Auditorio del Museo del Diseño de Barcelona (Pl. de les Glòries Catalanes, 37-38) Barcelona

La planificación urbana juega un papel determinante en la salud y el bienestar de las personas. Conscientes de ello, el próximo 14 de noviembre, la Diputación de Barcelona e ISGlobal realizaremos esta jornada que pretende ser un espacio de reflexión, de intercambio de experiencias y de debate sobre la relación entre el modelo de ciudad y la salud de quienes residen en ella. Se enmarca en el proyecto "Entorno urbano y salud", que fue galardonado con el premio EPSA 2015 por la transversalidad en su planteamiento.

El encuentro se dirige especialmente a cargos políticos y profesionales de la administración, de la Universidad y del sector privado que trabajen en el ámbito del entorno urbano y la salud. A lo largo del día, varias autoridades en estas materias expondrán el estado de la cuestión y cómo las intervenciones del entorno urbano pueden materializarse y favorecer a la salud y bienestar de la ciudadanía.

La conferencia inaugural correrá a cargo de la urbanista Jennifer Gardner, que lidera el programa del Instituto Jan Ghel para promover la salud y la inclusión en el diseño de las ciudades. En la clausura, se ofrecerá un debate sobre cómo incorporar la evidencia científica en las políticas públicas, a cargo del Dr. David Rojas, investigador de ISGlobal, y de la Dra. Aleth Maybank, responsable de Salud Pública en la Ciudad de Nueva York.